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Listen: Colonial Pipeline allocations return on higher demand, lower imports

Demand to ship gasoline on Colonial Pipeline has outpaced available space since October, a first in 19 months. The Atlantic Coast has seen higher demand, and imports are low. The spread between offline gasoline prices at the end of Line 1 in Greensboro, North Carolina, and prices at the origin in Houston, Texas, have reached their widest seasonal level in the last three years. In the meantime, Gulf Coast shippers are paying a premium to ship their barrels as soon as possible.

In this episode of the Oil Markets Podcast, S&P Global Platts gasoline editors Anna Trier and Sarah Hernandez discuss why this is happening and what the impact is on gasoline prices in the Gulf and Atlantic Coast regions.

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