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Section 232 challenge continues despite Supreme Court denial: AIIS

Pittsburgh — The American Institute for International Steel's appeal of a lower-court decision upholding US President Donald Trump's Section 232 tariffs on steel will continue on its normal course following a Monday decision by the US Supreme Court not to hear the case, the steel importers association said.

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"AIIS is disappointed that the Supreme Court did not agree to hear this case at this time. It is rare for the Supreme Court to agree to hear a case before a ruling by the Court of Appeals, and our appeal will now be heard by the US Court of Appeals for Federal Circuit," AIIS President Richard Criss said in a statement.

"We continue to believe that we have a strong legal case that Section 232 is unconstitutional. Once the Federal Circuit has spoken, we expect that the losing party will ask the Supreme Court to review that decision."

The Supreme Court's decision Monday not to hear the case allows a March ruling from the US Court of International Trade upholding the tariffs to remain in place.

The Steel Manufacturers Association said Monday it was encouraged by the Supreme Court's decision.

"Currently, 232 national security measures have led to increased capacity utilization, industry job growth, and additional investment announcements by steel producers throughout the United States," SMA President Philip Bell said in a statement. "President Trump imposed steel tariffs as a straightforward and effective measure countering against unfairly and illegally traded steel imports. Unfortunately, these imports continue to find their way to American soil."

-- Justine Coyne, justine.coyne@spglobal.com

-- Edited by Tom Balcerek, newsdesk@spglobal.com