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How Times Have Changed? CEO Gender Gap Analysis

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How Times Have Changed? CEO Gender Gap Analysis

A s greater emphasis is being placed on gender diversity at global companies and vigorous petitioning is taking place in the political sphere, it seems only natural that more women should assume the leadership Chief Executive Officer (CEO) positions. The assessment conducted by S&P Global Market Intelligence from 2009 to 2016 revealed the following key findings:

  • In a surprising and positive development since our previous report in March 2016, we are seeing increased momentum in closing the gender gap at blue chip companies across multiple sectors.
  • The gender gap at the CEO level of S&P Euro 350 and S&P 500 companies is showing signs of tightening more in America than in Europe. The growth rate of female CEOs for the S&P 500 is fractionally higher than the S&P Euro 350.
  • Out of the two indices, it is the S&P 500’s Information Technology, Utilities and Consumer Discretionary sectors which have the most female CEOs. Also, four sectors in the S&P Euro 350 do not have any female CEO representation compared to just two in the S&P 500.
  • 2016 female CEO’s lag male CEO’s in terms of median tenure by two years in both indices with longer tenures in general being recorded in the S&P 500 index.

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