En esta lista
Agricultura

US ethanol stocks and weekly production dip on Midwest slump: EIA

Agricultura | Biocombustibles

Biofuelscan

US ethanol stocks and weekly production dip on Midwest slump: EIA

US Midwest ethanol stocks hit a four-week low for the week ended January 31, plunging 230,000 barrels to 6.005 million barrels, Energy Information Administration data showed Wednesday.

Not registered?

Receive daily email alerts, subscriber notes & personalize your experience.

Register Now

Overall, US ethanol stocks tumbled 193,000 barrels to 16.739 million barrels, while weekly ethanol production across the US fell 5,000 b/d to 895,000 b/d.

Gulf Coast stocks lowered by 166,000 barrels to 2.732 million barrels, and West Coast stocks tumbled 23,000 barrels to 2.129 million barrels. On the other hand, East Coast stocks rebounded by 226,000 barrels to 5.568 million barrels, a 20-week high.


There were no ethanol imports registered for the 18th straight reporting week.

The ethanol days of supply -- calculated by dividing weekly ethanol stock levels by the weekly refiner and blender ethanol net input -- nudged up 0.1 day to 20.9 days of supply, as the proportional drop in the weekly refiner and blender ethanol net input -- which fell 14,000 b/d to 801,000 b/d -- was outweighed by the draw in overall ethanol stocks.

In other supply data, the weekly overall amount of gasoline produced tumbled 391,000 b/d to 8.796 million b/d. The weekly amount of gasoline blended with ethanol moved down 99,000 b/d to 8.056 million b/d.

As the weekly overall amount of gasoline blended with ethanol dropped alongside an decreasing amount of gasoline produced, the weekly ethanol blending percentage rose 2.8 percentage points to 91.6%.

The amount of gasoline blended with ethanol is calculated by adding the volume of reformulated gasoline blended with ethanol and conventional gasoline blended with ethanol. The ethanol blending percentage is calculated by dividing the weekly amount of gasoline blended with ethanol by total weekly gasoline production.

Meanwhile, the four-week rolling average of gasoline demand rose 44,000 b/d to 8.279 million b/d. The four-week rolling average of the refiner and blender net ethanol input nudged up 12,000 b/d to 804,000 b/d.

With a greater proportional increase in gasoline demand than blending demand, the four-week rolling average of the ethanol blending rate -- calculated by dividing the four-week rolling averages of the net ethanol input and gasoline demand -- gained 0.09 percentage point to an eight-month high of 9.71%, 0.29 percentage point shy of the 10% "blend wall."

Most non-flex-fuel vehicles in the US run on E10, or a 10% ethanol-gasoline mix. Some newer model years also have US Environmental Protection Agency clearance to run on E15.

The blend wall, which some observers think could be hit this year, occurs when the maximum amount of the US gasoline pool has been blended to a level of 10% ethanol. Refiners then will be under pressure to run higher ethanol blends, buy renewable credits known as RINs or push for Congress to alter the Renewable Fuel Standard.

RINs are a credit that can be used to meet federal renewables mandates for fuel sold in the US. Refiners and other obligated parties can meet the targets by blending renewables, such as biodiesel and ethanol, with fuel like diesel and gasoline, buying RINs, exporting refined products or altering their production of fuel that is not subject to the mandates, such as jet fuel.

--Jordan Godwin, jordan.godwin@platts.com
--Edited by Derek Sands, derek.sands@platts.com