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Editors' picks: Documents reveal Canadian lobbying effort to save Energy Star

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Editors' picks: Documents reveal Canadian lobbying effort to save Energy Star

SNL Energy editors' picks for the best stories for the week ended Oct. 6.

1. Documents reveal Canadian lobbying effort to save Energy Star

Most Americans easily recognize the blue and white Energy Star logo, which dons everything from televisions and refrigerators to windows and washing machines. But Canadians, too, have come to rely on the brand to make smarter decisions about their energy usage, and officials there are worried about a Trump administration proposal to zero out funding and shift the popular government-sponsored program to private interests or another nongovernment entity, according to recently released documents.

2. Wall Street views DOE grid proposal as anti-competitive

A U.S. Department of Energy proposal calling on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to ensure full cost recovery for certain nuclear and coal-fired assets drew skepticism from Wall Street, which characterized the proposal as vague and at odds with the nature of competitive power markets.

3. Stakeholders look to limit scope of Texas power market changes

In comments filed with Texas regulators, a diverse group of stakeholders pushed back against a proposed overhaul of the state's wholesale power market. The suite of proposals includes real-time co-optimization, which would find the most efficient way to procure energy and ancillary services every five minutes in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas real-time market.

4. Coal sector cheers as DOE push nods at increasing efforts to boost plants

The U.S. coal sector welcomed a move by the U.S. Department of Energy to reward power generators for storing fuel onsite, a strategy mirroring a recent industry push to hold on to a diminishing customer base.

5. Gas groups prep fight over DOE demand for 'de facto subsidy' for coal, nuclear

Behind the scenes, gas industry lobbyists feel betrayed by the Trump administration's attempt to force the power markets to compensate nuclear and coal plants at the expense of gas. On the public stage, those same industry groups plan to get into the regulatory weeds and fight the U.S. Department of Energy on the plan to favor "reliability and resilience" over price before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.