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Report: Union Pacific agrees to tighten safety rules after Ore. oil train wreck

Union Pacific Railroad Co. struck an agreement with the Federal Railroad Administration for more stringent inspections and maintenance months after a fiery derailment in Oregon in June and after the agency discovered more than 800 potential safety violations in a two-year investigation, The Associated Press reported.

The agreement would require Union Pacific to "go above and beyond existing regulations," Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg said, according to the AP report. The measures stipulated in the agreement would apply to all rail lines used for deliveries of oil and other hazardous materials, or about 22,500 miles of tracks.

Among them are an inventory of all curves in the track that are 3 degrees or greater and walking inspections every 120 days on tracks with the same kind of bolts as were to blame in the June derailment, according to the report.

In early June, a Union Pacific train carrying North Dakota crude passing the Columbia River Gorge derailed near Mosier, Ore., and caught fire. According to investigators, Union Pacific failed to follow its own track safety inspection rules and did not see the broken bolts that caused the accident.