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Former US Attorney Debra Wong Yang in consideration for head of SEC

President-elect Donald Trump is considering appointing former U.S. attorney Debra Wong Yang as the next chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Bloomberg News reported Dec. 19, citing an unnamed source "with direct knowledge of the matter."

Bloomberg reported that Yang was seen at Trump Tower on Dec. 5. Reuters reported earlier in December that Yang was under consideration for the SEC post.

In a statement Dec. 19, a spokesperson for the Trump Transition Team said "no decision has been made" for the SEC role.

Yang formerly served as U.S. attorney for the Central District of California before becoming a partner in the Los Angeles office of the law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher. She would be the second consecutive former federal prosecutor to head the SEC if appointed. Current Chair Mary Jo White, who said she would step down at the end of the Obama administration, was a U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York from 1993 to 2002.

Yang has had some experience with the White House, having served on former President George W. Bush's Corporate Fraud Task Force, which was established shortly after the Enron scandal to address corporate accountability.