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2018 US Insurtech Report

Studios, Exhibitors Set To Spar Over Streaming

Power Forecast Briefing Discusses Improved Spark Spreads and Profitability Projections for ERCOT and PJM

Energy

Power Forecast Briefing: Fleet Transformation, Under-Powered Markets, and Green Energy in 2018

Nexstar Buys WGN For A Song; Divestiture Of WGN, Stakes In Food Channels Likely

Insurance
2018 US Insurtech Report

Highlights

S&P Global Market Intelligence’s 2018 US Insurtech Market Report projects that U.S. private auto insurance premiums written via the direct-to-consumer channel will exceed $90 billion by 2022. The report also examines startup funding trends and identifies other business lines that could be ripe for insurtech disruption.

Nov. 30 2018 — U.S. insurance technology startups are numerous and still very much in their early years. As is common with an emerging fintech segment, investor and public interest in the space is high despite the risky nature of startup investing. The insurtech space had a recent gauge of public investor interest with the IPO of lead aggregator EverQuote. While the IPO priced above its expected range, the stock’s performance since then has been lackluster, a disappointing sign for others looking to go public. But many startups are still many years away from that goal, and there might be more investor appetite for different business models. Unlike Netflix and other companies that have caused wholesale disruption in various industries, many insurtech startups are working with incumbents rather than trying to replace them. Incumbents are avid investors in insurtech companies, and the digital agency model relies heavily, for now at least, on partnerships with established underwriters. Of the different insurtech business models, digital agencies and underwriters continue to attract the most funding and therefore form the focus of our report. Though many facets of their business model are not revolutionary, they have added meaningful innovation in some key areas. Certain business lines appear more ripe for innovation than others. In private auto, for instance, the direct distribution model already has a firm foothold and therefore seems less vulnerable to disruption by startups. S&P Global Market Intelligence projects that premiums written in the direct response channel will exceed $90 billion by 2022 and that they will account for more than 30% of overall U.S. auto premiums. But if the direct model can be applied to other lines, such as small business insurance or life insurance, that might produce a more dramatic challenger to the incumbent writers of those lines.

Early days

Interest in the U.S. insurtech space has spiked in recent years, fed by a large crop of startup companies. It is too early to assess how successful most insurtech startups and their investors will be as many companies are only a few years old at this point. In S&P Global Market Intelligence’s coverage universe, the median age of U.S. insurtech companies — based on the year they were founded — is seven years. But the recent spate of startups is even younger than that. The years 2015 and 2016 were a particularly bountiful time; companies founded in those two years alone account for roughly 22% of the coverage universe.

Appetite for disruption

One of the textbook examples of industry disruption is Netflix, which drastically reshaped the distribution of entertainment, first through its DVD mail service and again through its on-demand streaming service. These changes brought about the demise of in-store video rental giant Blockbuster, which reportedly had the chance to buy Netflix for only $50 million in 2000.

We do not foresee the same kind of seismic changes coming for much of the U.S. insurance industry, since the fundamental distribution model is not changing. The startups covered in this report — both digital agents and fullstack companies — are proponents of the direct distribution model, selling policies directly to consumers via their websites and/or mobile apps. But this is far from a novel concept. Areas of the insurance industry have embraced online, direct-to-consumer distribution for some time.

S&P Global Market Intelligence client? Click here to login and read the full 2018 US Insurtech Market Report

The projections reflect various assumptions regarding premiums, losses and expenses. They are a product of a sum-of-the-parts analysis of individual business lines that is informed by third-party macroeconomic forecasts, historical trends and recent market observations that include first-quarter 2017 statutory results and anecdotal commentary about market conditions. Projected results are displayed on a total-filed basis and are not intended for application to individual states, regions or companies. S&P Global Market Intelligence reserves the right to update the projections at any time for any reason.

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Technology, Media & Telecom
Studios, Exhibitors Set To Spar Over Streaming

Dec. 14 2018 — According to an article published in Variety in November, Warner Bros. and Universal Pictures are expected to reopen conversations with exhibitors about earlier VOD releases for their films. The studios argue that an earlier on-demand release helps minimize piracy and allows them to better leverage the multimillion-dollar ad campaigns launched for their films' theatrical debuts.

Exhibitors, on the other hand, worry that a shorter theatrical window will reduce ticket sales as potential patrons opt to wait and watch films at home. Fewer ticket sales also lead to lower concession revenues -- the most profitable aspect of the exhibition business.

The article also notes that studios have an extra incentive to negotiate earlier release windows, as WarnerMedia is launching its own streaming service in 2019 while Comcast, home of Universal, is looking to expand its streaming offerings. Having their major films released on their respective services shortly after theatrical release could help drive subscriber growth.

Pushing for a film's possible VOD release just weeks after its big-screen debut could be seen as an aggressive move, but studios have been slowly shrinking their theatrical release windows over the past 20 years. In 1999, the average theatrical window was 169 days; this was just as the DVD market was beginning to explode and the VHS cassette was still a market factor. Soon, DVD became a massive source of revenue for studios and they began to release their films on home video at a quicker pace. In 2017, the average theatrical window dropped to 105 days before dipping to 99 days in 2018.

The major studios all trimmed their theatrical windows by a fair amount between 2000 and 2018, from an average of 172 days down to 94 days, a difference of more than two and a half months. Twentieth Century Fox and Universal Studios had the shortest average theatrical window at 89 days, while Walt Disney had the longest theatrical window at 107 days.

We tracked eight blockbuster films in 2018 that were released on home video less than 90 days after premiering in theaters. The shortest window belonged to "Venom" ($212.3 million domestic gross), which was released in theaters on Oct. 5 and will debut on DVD and Blu-ray just 74 days later on Dec. 18.

The motion-picture business has always been able to capitalize on new technology, from the TV to the VCR to the DVD player, to drive growth. Streaming video has become the primary source for home entertainment — just ask Netflix and its 137.1 million subscribers worldwide. If studios are launching their own services, they naturally want their own premiere content on those services. Studios may not get the rapid release window they are hoping for, but they will likely keep bringing it down slowly, as they have for the past two decades.

If you are a client then learn more about Economics of TV & Film below:

Movies make their way to your home in less than 100 days in 2018

State of Home Entertainment 2018

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Watch: Power Forecast Briefing Discusses Improved Spark Spreads and Profitability Projections for ERCOT and PJM

Dec. 13 2018 — In our latest Power Forecast Briefing, Steve Piper discusses recent power market activity and a forecast that points to profitability for merchant generation regions of ERCOT and PJM. Both saw improved spark spreads in 2018, but ERCOT's upside appears more limited than PJM going forward. More data and market tracking tools can be found on the Market Intelligence platform’s Power Forecast subscription.

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Watch: Power Forecast Briefing: Fleet Transformation, Under-Powered Markets, and Green Energy in 2018

Steve Piper shares Power Forecast insights and a recap of recent events in the US power markets in Q4 of 2017. Watch our video for power generation trends and forecasts for utilities in 2018.

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Technology, Media & Telecom
Nexstar Buys WGN For A Song; Divestiture Of WGN, Stakes In Food Channels Likely

Dec. 10 2018 — Walt Disney Co.'s pending acquisition of much of 21st Century Fox Inc. certainly raised the bar for cable network valuations — at 15.4x cash flow — and the divestiture of the regional sports networks may see another double-digit-multiple transaction with Amazon.com Inc. in the mix of buyers. Another deal, Nexstar Media Group Inc.'s pending acquisition of Tribune Media Co., sees stakes in three cable nets going to the buyer for single-digit multiples (6.9x).

The deal follows the collapse of Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.'s deal to buy the company, which is now being litigated. We think that Nexstar is getting quite a deal on the cable network assets and will likely flip them for a quick profit.

When Discovery Inc. agreed to buy Scripps Networks Interactive Inc. in July 2017, the domestic cable networks were valued at $10.14 billion, or 10.5x cash flow, with Food Network (US) valued at $4.5 billion (Scripps owned 68.7%) and Cooking Channel (US) (also at 68.7%) valued at $525 million.

In the current transaction, the valuations come to $3.47 billion and $323 million, respectively. Thus, if Nexstar can get Discovery Communications to pay at least what it paid in the Scripps transaction, Nexstar may make a quick profit. Granted, minority interests typically trade at a discount. Scripps Networks Interactive, however, has tried for years to cut a deal to buy out the minority stake and it may be willing to strike a deal at a higher price to put this issue behind it.

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