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China, Indonesia ground Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets after Ethiopia crash

China ordered its airlines to suspend the commercial use of all Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets operated by them after the same model used by an Ethiopian airline crashed, killing all people on board.

The Civil Aviation Administration of China said all domestic airlines must ground the Boeing Co. jet before 6 p.m. local time March 11.

The move comes after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX 8 jet bound for Nairobi, Kenya, with 157 people on board crashed shortly after take-off March 10 from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The crash marks the second deadly accident involving the 737 MAX 8 jet, which entered service in 2017, Reuters reported. In October 2018, a 737 MAX 8 plane operated by Indonesian airline Lion Air crashed minutes after take-off, killing 189 people on board.

Ethiopian Airlines also canceled operations of all its 737 MAX 8 planes, while Cayman Airways grounded both its new jets of the same model. Indonesia said it will temporarily ground the involved Boeing model for inspection, Reuters said in a separate report, citing the country's director general of aviation.

Boeing describes the single-aisle 737 MAX jet as its "fastest-selling" airplane, with nearly 4,700 orders from more than 100 global customers. The 737 MAX plane accounts for nearly one-third of Boeing's operating profit and is estimated to generate about $30 billion in annual revenue, Bloomberg News said.

Shares in the airplane manufacturer were down 9.68% at around 8 a.m. ET in pre-market trading March 11.