trending Market Intelligence /marketintelligence/en/news-insights/trending/hvUCbfzJQvZ14HbufdbgDA2 content
Log in to other products

Login to Market Intelligence Platform

 /


Looking for more?

Contact Us

Request a Demo

You're one step closer to unlocking our suite of comprehensive and robust tools.

Fill out the form so we can connect you to the right person.

If your company has a current subscription with S&P Global Market Intelligence, you can register as a new user for access to the platform(s) covered by your license at Market Intelligence platform or S&P Capital IQ.

  • First Name*
  • Last Name*
  • Business Email *
  • Phone *
  • Company Name *
  • City *
  • We generated a verification code for you

  • Enter verification Code here*

* Required

In This List

China denies forced labor allegations after Tesco suspends production at factory

Gauging Supply Chain Risk In Volatile Times

S&P Global Market Intelligence

Cannabis: Hashing Out a Budding Industry

Segment

IFRS 9 Impairment How It Impacts Your Corporation And How We Can Help

The Market Intelligence Platform


China denies forced labor allegations after Tesco suspends production at factory

China denied allegations of forced labor at a Shanghai prison, following reports that Christmas cards sold by Tesco PLC were packed by inmates, Reuters reported.

A young girl had come across a message on a Tesco Christmas card, which said: "We are foreign prisoners in Shanghai Qingpu prison China. Forced to work against our will," Reuters reported, citing The Sunday Times.

Tesco suspended production at a Chinese factory, saying it detests the use of prison labor and would not allow it in its supply chain and launched an investigation.

According to the Times, the message urged the recipient to contact a British former journalist and corporate fraud investigator Peter Humphrey, who was imprisoned in the same jail from 2014 to 2015.

"I can responsibly say, according to the relevant organs, Shanghai's Qingpu prison does not have this issue of foreign prisoners being forced to work," China's foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said at a press briefing.

He dismissed the whole story as "a farce created by Mr. Humphrey."

Humphrey, who had spent 23 months in prison on charges of illegally obtaining private records of Chinese citizens and selling the information to clients, said the message fitted "with everything I know, and I have spoken with ex-prisoners who were released this year and who confirmed that that prison unit was making packaging for Tesco Christmas cards," Reuters reported.