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Mo. utility board votes to retire last 2 units at James River power plant

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Mo. utility board votes to retire last 2 units at James River power plant

The last two remaining electric generating units at the James River Power Station in Greene County, Mo., are set to close.

In an update released Dec. 5, City Utilities of Springfield's Board of Public Utilities said it voted to begin the retirement process for the gas-fired units — the 60-MW unit 4 and 105-MW unit 5. Unit 4 came online in 1964 and was last used in 2017, while unit 5 started service in 1970 and was last used in 2018, according to the board.

The update did not list an official retirement date. A representative for the utility was not immediately available Dec. 6 for further comment. The units' retirement from the marketplace now goes to the Southwest Power Pool for approval.

The plant's closure has been planned for some time. The board explained that the addition of a 300-MW unit at the John Twitty Energy Center (Southwest Power) in 2011 allowed for the gradual retirement of all five units at the James River plant. The utility retired three of the plant's coal-fired units in 2017.

The board said the addition of renewable energy contracts to replace lost generation capacity paved the way for closure of the two remaining units.

The James River Power Station CT, a two-unit, 155-MW facility located on the same site, will remain available for service, the board said.