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Voters reject most state energy initiatives, including anti-drilling, carbon fee

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Voters reject most state energy initiatives, including anti-drilling, carbon fee

In a dramatic 2018 midterm election, voters gave Democrats control of the U.S. House of Representatives and rejected high-profile state ballot measures that would have limited oil and gas drilling in Colorado and created a fee on carbon dioxide emissions in Washington state.

On the federal level, Democrats won the majority of seats in the House, meaning they will control that chamber for the first time since the 111th Congress that ended in early January 2011.

A Democrat-controlled House could bring heavy oversight of the Trump administration's efforts to roll back air and water quality rules and other regulations affecting the energy sector. Democrats may also pursue an infrastructure bill that includes energy-related provisions, although lawmakers will be challenged to agree on how to fund the legislation.

But Republicans held onto control of the U.S. Senate and even expanded their majority in that chamber. Continued leadership of the Senate will allow the GOP to more easily confirm Republican nominee Bernard McNamee to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which is currently split between two Republican and two Democratic members.