articles Corporate /en/research-insights/articles/the-new-york-clean-energy-standard-a-360-view content
BY CONTINUING TO USE THIS SITE, YOU ARE AGREEING TO OUR USE OF COOKIES. REVIEW OUR
PRIVACY & COOKIE NOTICE
Log in to other products

Login to Market Intelligence Platform

 /


Looking for more?

Request a Demo

You're one step closer to unlocking our suite of comprehensive and robust tools.

Fill out the form so we can connect you to the right person.

  • First Name*
  • Last Name*
  • Business Email *
  • Phone *
  • Company Name *
  • City *

* Required

In This List

The New York Clean Energy Standard – a 360 View

S&P Global

Best Practices in Corporate Climate Disclosure

S&P Global Platts

Index-based Blockchain Making the Container Industry Smarter

S&P Global Platts

Energy: What to Watch in 2019

S&P Global Ratings

Green Finance Takes Hold In The GCC


The New York Clean Energy Standard – a 360 View

Overview

The New York Public Service Commission's recently approved Clean Energy Standard, or CES, calls for 50% of New York's electricity to be procured from renewable energy sources by 2030, and creates a zero-emissions credit, or ZEC, framework. The objective of this framework is to preserve the environmental attributes of zero-emission nuclearpowered generating facilities operating within the state. But this step may have broader implications for energy markets, and regulatory constructs nationwide.

Weak demand and abundant natural gas reserves due largely to the shale gas boom have driven down wholesale power market prices, thereby pressuring the economic viability of nuclear plants. Passage of the ZEC framework marks the first time that a state commission has recognized the zero-carbon-emitting attributes of nuclear facilities by adopting a policy to ensure the continued operation of the facilities.

The ZEC framework is expected to have a significant impact on the energy landscape in New York, and once the dust settles from any legal challenges that may ensue, could, further serve as a model for other states with nuclear facilities that are at risk of closing due to cost challenges.